Photo Fakery at the New York Times

Wednesday's Example of Media Bias   —   Posted on January 18, 2006

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Directions

-Read the excerpt below from Thomas Lifson's report at AmericanThinker.com on Jan. 16th.
-Read "Types of Media Bias" in the right column. Then answer the questions.

Is a fake staged photo fit to print? What if it staged in a way that makes the US forces fighting the War on Terror look cruel and ineffective? The evidence argues that yes, it can run, and in a prominent position – at least in the case of the New York Times website.

It appears that the Times, once-upon-a-time regarded as the last word in reliability when it comes to checking before publishing (which makes them so much better than blogs, of course), has run a fake photo on the home page of its website. The photo has since been removed from the home page, but still can be seen here [or here]. 
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So the formerly authoritative New York Times has published a picture distributed around the world on the home page of its website, using a prop which must have been artfully placed to create a false dramatic impression of cruel incompetence on the part of U.S. forces. Not only did the editors lack the basic knowledge necessary to detect the fake, they didn’t bother to run the photo past anyone with such knowledge before exposing the world to it.

There is an old saying in journalism about stories which editors really want to run: “too good to check.” It is plainly clear that the New York Times thought this story was too good to check. Their standard of “good” is painfully obvious to all.

Without the internet and blogosphere, probably they would have gotten away with it. …

The New York Times has now corrected the caption.

For the complete report, go to AmericanThinker.com

Questions

Do you agree with Mr. Lifson’s conclusion that “It is plainly clear that the New York Times thought this story was too good to check”?  Explain your answer.


Scroll down to the bottom of the page for the answers.
























Answer(s)

Opinion question.  Answers vary.